Emperor Nero’s fabled rotating dining room is finally unearthed

Emperor Nero's_ rotating dining room

Emperor Nero who ruled from 54 to 68 AD, was believed to have a myriad of personality idiosyncrasies, ranging from occasions of disturbing sadism to bouts of ludicrous delusions. After all, many Romans held him responsible for the Great Fire of Rome, while evidences are also found pertaining to early Christians being burned in his garden for just providing illumination. But this time around, archaeologists have possibly discovered something which relates to advanced art rather than disconcerting imagery – they have stumbled across Nero’s long lost rotating dining room.

The ruins of the wondrous space was unearthed by archaeologists when they were excavating the Domus Aurea (Golden House). The ‘Golden House’ was Nero’s grand portico villa with imposing landscaping, built in the very heart of Ancient Rome. The researching team, headed by Françoise Villedieu, came upon a robust pillar-supported circular room in the site, after more than four months of painstaking digging and salvaging.

Emperor Nero's_ rotating dining room_1

The legendary dining room was first mentioned by Suetonius after 60 years of Nero’s demise. The Roman historian described something about a revolving room that had the capacity to rotate all throughout the day, thus mimicking the motion of celestial bodies. In fact, many historians believe the innovative space to have a special revolving wooden floor and a fascinating ceiling painted with astronomical details of stars. Furthermore, the room perhaps even had hidden panels that contained perfumes and floral bits that could be sprinkled on to the central dining table.

As for the momentous discovery itself, Roberto Cecchi (who is Rome’s current commissioner for archaeology) has promised more funds to the archaeologists for further disclosure on the unearthed scope. We can only keep our fingers crossed and wish the researchers luck with the ongoing investigation of the incredible rotating dining room of Nero.

Emperor Nero's_ rotating dining room_2

Via: DailyMail

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Emperor Nero’s fabled rotating dining room is finally unearthed

Emperor Nero who ruled from 54 to 68 AD, was believed to have a myriad of personality idiosyncrasies, ranging from occasions of disturbing sadism to bouts of ludicrous delusions. After all, many Romans held him responsible for the Great Fire of Rome, while evidences are also found pertaining to early Christians being burned in his garden for just providing illumination. But this time around, archaeologists have possibly discovered something which relates to advanced art rather than disconcerting imagery – they have stumbled across Nero’s long lost rotating dining room.

The ruins of the wondrous space was unearthed by archaeologists when they were excavating the Domus Aurea (Golden House). The ‘Golden House’ was Nero’s grand portico villa with imposing landscaping, built in the very heart of Ancient Rome. The researching team, headed by Françoise Villedieu, came upon a robust pillar-supported circular room in the site, after more than four months of painstaking digging and salvaging.

Emperor Nero's_ rotating dining room_1

The legendary dining room was first mentioned by Suetonius after 60 years of Nero’s demise. The Roman historian described something about a revolving room that had the capacity to rotate all throughout the day, thus mimicking the motion of celestial bodies. In fact, many historians believe the innovative space to have a special revolving wooden floor and a fascinating ceiling painted with astronomical details of stars. Furthermore, the room perhaps even had hidden panels that contained perfumes and floral bits that could be sprinkled on to the central dining table.

As for the momentous discovery itself, Roberto Cecchi (who is Rome’s current commissioner for archaeology) has promised more funds to the archaeologists for further disclosure on the unearthed scope. We can only keep our fingers crossed and wish the researchers luck with the ongoing investigation of the incredible rotating dining room of Nero.

Emperor Nero's_ rotating dining room_2

Via: DailyMail

  Subscribe to HEXAPOLIS

To join over 1,100 of our dedicated subscribers, simply provide your email address: