Doctor fixes a set of prosthetic Lego wheels for a disabled tortoise

Disabled Tortoise_Lego Wheels

When it comes to human-aid systems, we have a range of prosthetic solutions from limb replacements to even neuronal proxies. But unfortunately, the animals lose out on many such tech fueled possibilities when they meet with accidents or health predicaments. However, there is always ingenuity to save the day. And fortuitously that is what happened in the case of Blade, a tiny tortoise who was fitted with customized working Lego wheels.

Initially, Blade was found to have some health problems – including worms and a growth disorder, when he was taken to the vet by his caring owner Iris Peste. Dr. Carsten Plischke found out that the tortoise was too weak to make use of its limbs, a predicament compounded by the heftiness of the animal’s shell. So the doctor ingeniously decided to make use of the shell’s weight for guiding the motional attributes of the tortoise.

Disabled Tortoise_Lego Wheels_1

This pertained to a nifty solution which required the use of his kid’s Lego set. The Lego bricks were simply attached to the underside of the shell, and then four wheels were fixed to the plastic supports. The end result was a small tortoise who could jauntily scoot his way across the rooms with his new set of wheels. The fun system however is not a permanent solution, with the wheels expected to come off when Blade has regained his vigor and health.

This is what Dr. Carsten Plischke had to say about his groovy little contrivance –

The size variation of animals means they can’t establish uniform products. So you have to come up with creative solutions; every animal needs its own treatment.

Lame tortoise fitted with Lego wheels, Bielefeld, Germany - 26 Nov 2014 Disabled Tortoise_Lego Wheels_3 Lame tortoise fitted with Lego wheels, Bielefeld, Germany - 26 Nov 2014 Disabled Tortoise_Lego Wheels

Via: Orange

Image Credits: REX

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Doctor fixes a set of prosthetic Lego wheels for a disabled tortoise

When it comes to human-aid systems, we have a range of prosthetic solutions from limb replacements to even neuronal proxies. But unfortunately, the animals lose out on many such tech fueled possibilities when they meet with accidents or health predicaments. However, there is always ingenuity to save the day. And fortuitously that is what happened in the case of Blade, a tiny tortoise who was fitted with customized working Lego wheels.

Initially, Blade was found to have some health problems – including worms and a growth disorder, when he was taken to the vet by his caring owner Iris Peste. Dr. Carsten Plischke found out that the tortoise was too weak to make use of its limbs, a predicament compounded by the heftiness of the animal’s shell. So the doctor ingeniously decided to make use of the shell’s weight for guiding the motional attributes of the tortoise.

Disabled Tortoise_Lego Wheels_1

This pertained to a nifty solution which required the use of his kid’s Lego set. The Lego bricks were simply attached to the underside of the shell, and then four wheels were fixed to the plastic supports. The end result was a small tortoise who could jauntily scoot his way across the rooms with his new set of wheels. The fun system however is not a permanent solution, with the wheels expected to come off when Blade has regained his vigor and health.

This is what Dr. Carsten Plischke had to say about his groovy little contrivance –

The size variation of animals means they can’t establish uniform products. So you have to come up with creative solutions; every animal needs its own treatment.

Lame tortoise fitted with Lego wheels, Bielefeld, Germany - 26 Nov 2014 Disabled Tortoise_Lego Wheels_3 Lame tortoise fitted with Lego wheels, Bielefeld, Germany - 26 Nov 2014 Disabled Tortoise_Lego Wheels

Via: Orange

Image Credits: REX

  Subscribe to HEXAPOLIS

To join over 1,200 of our dedicated subscribers, simply provide your email address: