House in Hibaru takes the slanting route to offer incredible views of a water-reservoir

House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office

The simply christened ‘House in Hibaru’ by Japan-based Suppose Design Office takes its gradient to a whole new level by slanting downwards towards an adjacent water-reservoir (in Fukuoka, Japan). The sloping design boasts of a split level residence that accounts for 112 sq m (1,205 sq ft) And, this conspicuous gradient is divided into three levels – with the lower-most floor pertaining to the living and dining room with a terrace that offers expansive views of the proximate water body.

House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_1

As one can make out from the images, the defining feature of the House in Hibaru is its pitched roof that is twice as big on the slanting side. This intentionally created angle closely follows the natural slope of the site, and as such allows for the multiple levels inside the seamless volume of the residence. To that end, the level ‘above’ the aforementioned living space accounts for the bedrooms of the house, while the upper-most level (or ground level in this case) comprises of the storage spaces. All of these three levels are bound by a ‘ribbon’ of transparent glazing that gives the users the opportunity to view their surroundings in a panoramic manner.

The overhanging roof also plays its part in hiding the concrete finishes of the exterior walls. This concrete facades are also left exposed on the inside, but are mellowed down with the techniques of wooden works (that also cover the extended ceiling) and variant joinery. And, since the structure is extensive in its footprint, the entire residence is supported by an arrangement of columns that are painted black to stand out as a definitive part of the stylish interior decor.

House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_2

And lastly, as for the experience expected when traversing this slanting yet expansive space, the designers make it clear in a succinct manner –

Once you have entered the house, the first thing you see is a semi-closed hall, but if you take a few steps further you can catch a glimpse of the beautiful lake framed by the roof. With moving downstairs, the scenery and the atmosphere change. You feel like you are in a quiet space such as a small lodge on a field, or a calm place like at a bench along the shore.

House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_7 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_4 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_5 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_6 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_8 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_9 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_10

Via: Curbed

Image Credits: Toshiyuki Yano

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House in Hibaru takes the slanting route to offer incredible views of a water-reservoir

The simply christened ‘House in Hibaru’ by Japan-based Suppose Design Office takes its gradient to a whole new level by slanting downwards towards an adjacent water-reservoir (in Fukuoka, Japan). The sloping design boasts of a split level residence that accounts for 112 sq m (1,205 sq ft) And, this conspicuous gradient is divided into three levels – with the lower-most floor pertaining to the living and dining room with a terrace that offers expansive views of the proximate water body.

House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_1

As one can make out from the images, the defining feature of the House in Hibaru is its pitched roof that is twice as big on the slanting side. This intentionally created angle closely follows the natural slope of the site, and as such allows for the multiple levels inside the seamless volume of the residence. To that end, the level ‘above’ the aforementioned living space accounts for the bedrooms of the house, while the upper-most level (or ground level in this case) comprises of the storage spaces. All of these three levels are bound by a ‘ribbon’ of transparent glazing that gives the users the opportunity to view their surroundings in a panoramic manner.

The overhanging roof also plays its part in hiding the concrete finishes of the exterior walls. This concrete facades are also left exposed on the inside, but are mellowed down with the techniques of wooden works (that also cover the extended ceiling) and variant joinery. And, since the structure is extensive in its footprint, the entire residence is supported by an arrangement of columns that are painted black to stand out as a definitive part of the stylish interior decor.

House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_2

And lastly, as for the experience expected when traversing this slanting yet expansive space, the designers make it clear in a succinct manner –

Once you have entered the house, the first thing you see is a semi-closed hall, but if you take a few steps further you can catch a glimpse of the beautiful lake framed by the roof. With moving downstairs, the scenery and the atmosphere change. You feel like you are in a quiet space such as a small lodge on a field, or a calm place like at a bench along the shore.

House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_7 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_4 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_5 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_6 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_8 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_9 House in Hibaru_Japan_Suppose Design Office_10

Via: Curbed

Image Credits: Toshiyuki Yano

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