A triangular concrete ‘fort’ residence in the historic region of Megara, Greece

During ancient times, Megara was considered as one of the four main regions of Attica, as epitomized by the the four mythic sons of King Pandion II. And nestled in this scenic Greek location overrun by serene olive groves and bucolic hills, is Tense Architecture Network’s designed concrete house with a fascinating triangular plan. In fact, the residence in itself is flanked by over 300 olive trees and the proximate Gerania Mountains, thus boasting of panoramic rustic views of the historic landscape.

The triangular plan tapers out in the direction of the hills, while its other facades face towards the plains of the south. Interestingly, the plan itself defines more of a compound area rather than just a habitable space. To that end, the layout also comprises of a courtyard in the middle surrounded by the nigh brutalist concrete walls. According to the architects –

The residence had to make a choice. The mountainous volume lies to the north; the residence directs itself there, renouncing the distant plain. The house is a frugal yet decisive answer to the need of a family shelter in the midst of a rather reclusive site.

Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_1

As for the spatial zoning inside this ‘compound’, the concrete house is mainly divided into two blocks (on two sides of the courtyard) with variant circulation patterns. The bigger block consists of the open living and dining area, with gorgeous views of the adjacent mountains. On other the hand, the smaller block accounts for the privacy-oriented areas like bedrooms and user-defined spaces. This zone is flanked by a small pocket of a garden situated at the ‘tip’ of the triangle.

The two definitive volumes in turn are connected by a glazed corridor that meanders through one end of the courtyard. The opposite side is denoted by a concrete wall interspersed by ceiling-high openings that provide glimpses into the paradisiacal landscape of the plains. This bucolic essence is further accentuated by the earthy glaze of the exposed concrete walls – which makes them seamlessly blend in with the rustic secluded site. The sylvan essence is further enhanced with use of actual vegetation like fragrant herbs and trailing plants that dot the courtyard walls and roofs of the Megara residence.

Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_2 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_3 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_4 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_5 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_6 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_7 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_8 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_9 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_10 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_12 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_11 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence

Via: Inhabitat

Image Credits: Petros Perakis

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A triangular concrete ‘fort’ residence in the historic region of Megara, Greece

During ancient times, Megara was considered as one of the four main regions of Attica, as epitomized by the the four mythic sons of King Pandion II. And nestled in this scenic Greek location overrun by serene olive groves and bucolic hills, is Tense Architecture Network’s designed concrete house with a fascinating triangular plan. In fact, the residence in itself is flanked by over 300 olive trees and the proximate Gerania Mountains, thus boasting of panoramic rustic views of the historic landscape.

The triangular plan tapers out in the direction of the hills, while its other facades face towards the plains of the south. Interestingly, the plan itself defines more of a compound area rather than just a habitable space. To that end, the layout also comprises of a courtyard in the middle surrounded by the nigh brutalist concrete walls. According to the architects –

The residence had to make a choice. The mountainous volume lies to the north; the residence directs itself there, renouncing the distant plain. The house is a frugal yet decisive answer to the need of a family shelter in the midst of a rather reclusive site.

Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_1

As for the spatial zoning inside this ‘compound’, the concrete house is mainly divided into two blocks (on two sides of the courtyard) with variant circulation patterns. The bigger block consists of the open living and dining area, with gorgeous views of the adjacent mountains. On other the hand, the smaller block accounts for the privacy-oriented areas like bedrooms and user-defined spaces. This zone is flanked by a small pocket of a garden situated at the ‘tip’ of the triangle.

The two definitive volumes in turn are connected by a glazed corridor that meanders through one end of the courtyard. The opposite side is denoted by a concrete wall interspersed by ceiling-high openings that provide glimpses into the paradisiacal landscape of the plains. This bucolic essence is further accentuated by the earthy glaze of the exposed concrete walls – which makes them seamlessly blend in with the rustic secluded site. The sylvan essence is further enhanced with use of actual vegetation like fragrant herbs and trailing plants that dot the courtyard walls and roofs of the Megara residence.

Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_2 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_3 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_4 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_5 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_6 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_7 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_8 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_9 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_10 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_12 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence_11 Megara_Triangular_Concrete_Residence

Via: Inhabitat

Image Credits: Petros Perakis

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