The Dutch Windwheel: A futuristic ‘habitable’ take on the traditional Dutch windmill

Dutch Windwheel_EWICON

It is not often that public installations go the green way by actually having a positive effect on the environment. Well, the above pictured ‘installation’ Dutch Windwheel does one better by being envisaged to be a giant wind turbine of sorts, while also doubling as an imposing habitable unit. A massive conceptual structure concocted by TU Delft (who worked on the actual technology, initially) and its partners (including BLOC, DoepelStrijkers and NBTC Holland Marketing), the design is contrived for the Dutch port city of Rotterdam, and will boast of a circular frame of steel and glass standing high amid the surrounding wetlands.

As we can make out from the images (below), the Dutch Windwheel will be flaunting its double rings – with the outer ring comprises of 40 capsules that will provide breathtaking views of the surrounding cityscape for the visitors of Rotterdam. On the other hand, the inner ring is envisioned to have around 72 apartments accompanied by 160 hotel guest rooms, retail outlets and a restaurant at the crown-top – thus transforming the circular ambit into a mixed use space.

Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_1

Coming to the technological side of affairs, the Dutch Windwheel will exhibit the EWICON (electrostatic wind energy converter) that generates clean energy by the wind effect on charged particles displacements that take place in an opposite direction of an electrical field. In other words, the EWICON eschews motional mechanical parts, thus effectively upholding the virtues of lesser noise and better maintenance.

Interestingly, the scope of wind energy is not the only avenue of green technology in use at the Dutch Windwheel. The installation/habitation unit will also boast of rainwater collection systems, tap water recycling mechanism, water management systems and the capacity to produce bio-gas from the organic waste of the inhabitants themselves. These will be complemented by an array of solar panels, thus making the sustainable ambit a ‘full circle’ – as a figurative yet practical support for the imposing circular rings.

Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_2 Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_7 Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_4 Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_5 Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_6

Via: Phys

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The Dutch Windwheel: A futuristic ‘habitable’ take on the traditional Dutch windmill

It is not often that public installations go the green way by actually having a positive effect on the environment. Well, the above pictured ‘installation’ Dutch Windwheel does one better by being envisaged to be a giant wind turbine of sorts, while also doubling as an imposing habitable unit. A massive conceptual structure concocted by TU Delft (who worked on the actual technology, initially) and its partners (including BLOC, DoepelStrijkers and NBTC Holland Marketing), the design is contrived for the Dutch port city of Rotterdam, and will boast of a circular frame of steel and glass standing high amid the surrounding wetlands.

As we can make out from the images (below), the Dutch Windwheel will be flaunting its double rings – with the outer ring comprises of 40 capsules that will provide breathtaking views of the surrounding cityscape for the visitors of Rotterdam. On the other hand, the inner ring is envisioned to have around 72 apartments accompanied by 160 hotel guest rooms, retail outlets and a restaurant at the crown-top – thus transforming the circular ambit into a mixed use space.

Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_1

Coming to the technological side of affairs, the Dutch Windwheel will exhibit the EWICON (electrostatic wind energy converter) that generates clean energy by the wind effect on charged particles displacements that take place in an opposite direction of an electrical field. In other words, the EWICON eschews motional mechanical parts, thus effectively upholding the virtues of lesser noise and better maintenance.

Interestingly, the scope of wind energy is not the only avenue of green technology in use at the Dutch Windwheel. The installation/habitation unit will also boast of rainwater collection systems, tap water recycling mechanism, water management systems and the capacity to produce bio-gas from the organic waste of the inhabitants themselves. These will be complemented by an array of solar panels, thus making the sustainable ambit a ‘full circle’ – as a figurative yet practical support for the imposing circular rings.

Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_2 Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_7 Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_4 Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_5 Dutch Windwheel_EWICON_6

Via: Phys

  Subscribe to HEXAPOLIS

To join over 1,100 of our dedicated subscribers, simply provide your email address: