Behold the world’s “largest pivoting window” incorporated in a newly renovated house

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A renovation project in a suburban area rarely equates to a world record being shattered. But that is exactly what Belgian studio Sculp IT has claimed to have achieved with their incredible endeavor in an Antwerp-based residence. The feat in question here entails a pair of gargantuan glass doors that go up to 6 m (or 20 ft) in height while weighing an impressive 4 tonnes. In essence, the ‘windows’ (or doors) easily cross the ceiling-high threshold by accounting for two floors of height. As for their purpose, the transparent facades provide the much needed connection between the interior-located kitchen (and dining room) and the exterior garden on the rear side of the house.

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The new extension of the residence has been christened as LALO, with its architectural function being noted as a three-floor renovation that would take advantages of both natural light and the adjacent garden views. Such ‘intrinsic’ connections with the surrounding nature were aided by the use of insulated glass (for the rear-end facades). And beyond just visual linking, the doors/windows boast of pivot mechanism, as opposed to the conventional hinge – a design solution achieved by the duo of Pieter Peerlings and Silvia Mertens.

As for the other aspects of the renovation, one could make out the profusion of concrete used for the opaque sections. This includes the polished concrete areas of the floor that make their way into the outer-garden terrace. Furthermore, concrete is also used for the large countertop of the kitchen, thus upholding the ambit of design and textural continuity. However, the ‘piece de resistance’ of the scope would arguably pertain to the kitchen island that comes with its own set of casters – thus hinting at a flexible (and large) barbecuing zone.

Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_3 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_4 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_5 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_6 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_7 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_8 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_9 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_10
Via: Dezeen / Images Credit: Luc Roymans

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Behold the world’s “largest pivoting window” incorporated in a newly renovated house

A renovation project in a suburban area rarely equates to a world record being shattered. But that is exactly what Belgian studio Sculp IT has claimed to have achieved with their incredible endeavor in an Antwerp-based residence. The feat in question here entails a pair of gargantuan glass doors that go up to 6 m (or 20 ft) in height while weighing an impressive 4 tonnes. In essence, the ‘windows’ (or doors) easily cross the ceiling-high threshold by accounting for two floors of height. As for their purpose, the transparent facades provide the much needed connection between the interior-located kitchen (and dining room) and the exterior garden on the rear side of the house.

Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_2

The new extension of the residence has been christened as LALO, with its architectural function being noted as a three-floor renovation that would take advantages of both natural light and the adjacent garden views. Such ‘intrinsic’ connections with the surrounding nature were aided by the use of insulated glass (for the rear-end facades). And beyond just visual linking, the doors/windows boast of pivot mechanism, as opposed to the conventional hinge – a design solution achieved by the duo of Pieter Peerlings and Silvia Mertens.

As for the other aspects of the renovation, one could make out the profusion of concrete used for the opaque sections. This includes the polished concrete areas of the floor that make their way into the outer-garden terrace. Furthermore, concrete is also used for the large countertop of the kitchen, thus upholding the ambit of design and textural continuity. However, the ‘piece de resistance’ of the scope would arguably pertain to the kitchen island that comes with its own set of casters – thus hinting at a flexible (and large) barbecuing zone.

Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_3 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_4 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_5 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_6 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_7 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_8 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_9 Sculp_IT_largest_pivoting_wndow_10
Via: Dezeen / Images Credit: Luc Roymans

  Subscribe to HEXAPOLIS

To join over 1,100 of our dedicated subscribers, simply provide your email address: