Let’s raise our hats to the unique Dome House with its assembled set of ‘triangles’

Last month, we talked about New Zealand's nature-inspired church built entirely from trees and plants. Well, this time around, the organic scope makes way for man-made wonderment in the form of the Dome House, located within a Paremoremo property (by the outskirts of Auckland). On closer inspection, one could identify the individual pieces of triangular panels that make up this geodesic dome. These were cut and assembled on-site (within a week), thus resulting in a purpose-built structure that fitted with the available floor and wall spaces. And as time is witness, the fabricated dwelling does hint at an engineering marvel of sorts, with the house surviving for almost 30 years while still maintaining its structural integrity. Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_3 Interestingly, there is more to the Dome House than just its architectural uniqueness - and much of it relates to its inhabitants. That is because the 2,023 sq m (or 21,700 sq ft) geodesic dwelling was the home to late Helen ‘Twink’ McCabe and her partner Noel Fuller. ‘Twink’ McCabe was known for her dedication to cats, and as such even introduced two new cat breeds to New Zealand: ocicat and munchkin cat. This feline ambit is quite appropriately demonstrated by a boutique cattery that is situated next-door to the Dome House. Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_4 Now, as for the current state of the Dome House, the residence is already sold to a new owner, by probably fetching a good price with its plywood exterior (complemented by a rimu interior) and fascinating form. And in case you are wondering about the interior design, do take a gander at some of the images below that aptly showcase the finesse of the previous home-owners. Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_5Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_6Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_7Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_8Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_9Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_2 Via: Stuff

Last month, we talked about New Zealand’s nature-inspired church built entirely from trees and plants. Well, this time around, the organic scope makes way for man-made wonderment in the form of the Dome House, located within a Paremoremo property (by the outskirts of Auckland). On closer inspection, one could identify the individual pieces of triangular panels that make up this geodesic dome. These were cut and assembled on-site (within a week), thus resulting in a purpose-built structure that fitted with the available floor and wall spaces. And as time is witness, the fabricated dwelling does hint at an engineering marvel of sorts, with the house surviving for almost 30 years while still maintaining its structural integrity.

Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_3

Interestingly, there is more to the Dome House than just its architectural uniqueness – and much of it relates to its inhabitants. That is because the 2,023 sq m (or 21,700 sq ft) geodesic dwelling was the home to late Helen ‘Twink’ McCabe and her partner Noel Fuller. ‘Twink’ McCabe was known for her dedication to cats, and as such even introduced two new cat breeds to New Zealand: ocicat and munchkin cat. This feline ambit is quite appropriately demonstrated by a boutique cattery that is situated next-door to the Dome House.

Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_4

Now, as for the current state of the Dome House, the residence is already sold to a new owner, by probably fetching a good price with its plywood exterior (complemented by a rimu interior) and fascinating form. And in case you are wondering about the interior design, do take a gander at some of the images below that aptly showcase the finesse of the previous home-owners.

Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_5 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_6 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_7 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_8 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_9 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_2

Via: Stuff

  • Don

    These types of structures are far from new or even revolutionary. You could get plans for a dome house fabricated from triangle panels years ago from Popular Mechanics magazine. Also there is a company in Idaho (Dome Technologies believe it is) that has been putting up dome homes and large commercial structures for a long time. These structures will survive about anything that nature can throw at them.

  Subscribe to HEXAPOLIS

To join over 1,100 of our dedicated subscribers, simply provide your email address:


ps_menu_class_0
ps_menu_class_1
ps_menu_class_2
ps_menu_class_3
ps_menu_class_4
ps_menu_class_5
ps_menu_class_6

Let’s raise our hats to the unique Dome House with its assembled set of ‘triangles’

Last month, we talked about New Zealand’s nature-inspired church built entirely from trees and plants. Well, this time around, the organic scope makes way for man-made wonderment in the form of the Dome House, located within a Paremoremo property (by the outskirts of Auckland). On closer inspection, one could identify the individual pieces of triangular panels that make up this geodesic dome. These were cut and assembled on-site (within a week), thus resulting in a purpose-built structure that fitted with the available floor and wall spaces. And as time is witness, the fabricated dwelling does hint at an engineering marvel of sorts, with the house surviving for almost 30 years while still maintaining its structural integrity.

Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_3

Interestingly, there is more to the Dome House than just its architectural uniqueness – and much of it relates to its inhabitants. That is because the 2,023 sq m (or 21,700 sq ft) geodesic dwelling was the home to late Helen ‘Twink’ McCabe and her partner Noel Fuller. ‘Twink’ McCabe was known for her dedication to cats, and as such even introduced two new cat breeds to New Zealand: ocicat and munchkin cat. This feline ambit is quite appropriately demonstrated by a boutique cattery that is situated next-door to the Dome House.

Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_4

Now, as for the current state of the Dome House, the residence is already sold to a new owner, by probably fetching a good price with its plywood exterior (complemented by a rimu interior) and fascinating form. And in case you are wondering about the interior design, do take a gander at some of the images below that aptly showcase the finesse of the previous home-owners.

Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_5 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_6 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_7 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_8 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_9 Auckland_Dome House_Geodesic_2

Via: Stuff

  1. Don says:

    These types of structures are far from new or even revolutionary. You could get plans for a dome house fabricated from triangle panels years ago from Popular Mechanics magazine. Also there is a company in Idaho (Dome Technologies believe it is) that has been putting up dome homes and large commercial structures for a long time. These structures will survive about anything that nature can throw at them.

Comments are closed.

  Subscribe to HEXAPOLIS

To join over 1,100 of our dedicated subscribers, simply provide your email address: