Magic Leap apparently makes a ‘big leap’ in Augmented Reality – as shown in new video

Magic_Leap_New_Video_Augmented_Reality

For the last few months, both technological scopes Virtual Reality (like Oculus Rift) and Augmented Reality (like Microsoft’s Hololens) have been making their publicity rounds in the realm of electronics. And now, the oft-mysterious Magic Leap has joined the fray, with their incredible demonstration of the power of next-generation Augmented Reality (AR). Showcased through a new demo video which is claimed to be shot directly via Magic Leap (without any special effects or compositing), the technology does make a compelling case for futurism inside your very living room.

 
For quite some time now, experts and pundits were a bit mystified by Magic Leap’s approach to the much touted AR technological ambit. A few even guessed it to be a form of retinal projection, with the digital overlay being directly sent to the eye. In any case, the company has now come forth and demonstrated the sheer potential of AR that can (virtually) affect our immediate environments. For example, in the video, one could see a robot playfully peeking from underneath the user’s desk, while an entire solar system model is displayed along another table surface.

So, as opposed to VR – which conforms to a fully virtual setting, the AR tech makes use of the real setting and then complements it with dynamic 3D digital objects. Simply put, you can comprehend (and even interact) with 3D virtual objects in the familiar setting of your bedroom and living rooms. In essence, this scope of ‘familiarity’ opens up a whole new commercial potential for the AR tech – which unlike VR, could go beyond certain niches like video games and military training. And since we brought up the commercial side of affairs, the Magic Leap headsets (or eye-wears) might be available for large-scale consumption sooner than later. As Magic Leap CEO Rony Abovitz made it clear

We’re actually gearing up to build millions of things. We’re not ready to announce when we’re shipping, but it gives you a signal that we’re not far.

And after you are done with the previous video, do take a gander at this video that showcases the Magic Leap AR tech (or as it was in March of this year), done with some special effects aid.

 

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Magic Leap apparently makes a ‘big leap’ in Augmented Reality – as shown in new video

Magic_Leap_New_Video_Augmented_Reality

For the last few months, both technological scopes Virtual Reality (like Oculus Rift) and Augmented Reality (like Microsoft’s Hololens) have been making their publicity rounds in the realm of electronics. And now, the oft-mysterious Magic Leap has joined the fray, with their incredible demonstration of the power of next-generation Augmented Reality (AR). Showcased through a new demo video which is claimed to be shot directly via Magic Leap (without any special effects or compositing), the technology does make a compelling case for futurism inside your very living room.

 
For quite some time now, experts and pundits were a bit mystified by Magic Leap’s approach to the much touted AR technological ambit. A few even guessed it to be a form of retinal projection, with the digital overlay being directly sent to the eye. In any case, the company has now come forth and demonstrated the sheer potential of AR that can (virtually) affect our immediate environments. For example, in the video, one could see a robot playfully peeking from underneath the user’s desk, while an entire solar system model is displayed along another table surface.

So, as opposed to VR – which conforms to a fully virtual setting, the AR tech makes use of the real setting and then complements it with dynamic 3D digital objects. Simply put, you can comprehend (and even interact) with 3D virtual objects in the familiar setting of your bedroom and living rooms. In essence, this scope of ‘familiarity’ opens up a whole new commercial potential for the AR tech – which unlike VR, could go beyond certain niches like video games and military training. And since we brought up the commercial side of affairs, the Magic Leap headsets (or eye-wears) might be available for large-scale consumption sooner than later. As Magic Leap CEO Rony Abovitz made it clear

We’re actually gearing up to build millions of things. We’re not ready to announce when we’re shipping, but it gives you a signal that we’re not far.

And after you are done with the previous video, do take a gander at this video that showcases the Magic Leap AR tech (or as it was in March of this year), done with some special effects aid.

 

  Subscribe to HEXAPOLIS

To join over 1,100 of our dedicated subscribers, simply provide your email address: