Scientists believe bad hair days could be the result of gene mutations

bad-hair-days

Ever wondered why you wake up with horrid, tangled hair? Or why you seem to have more bad hair days than the next person? As part of a new study, scientists have identified three genes that are responsible for what they call “uncombable hair syndrome”, basically the kind of dry and frizzy hair that is just impossible to comb flat.

If you find yourself having more bad hair days than good, you might be suffering from this rather strange condition. Diagnosis, according to the researchers, involves acquiring hair strands from the patient, which are then cut lengthwise and studied using a powerful electron microscope.

Unmanageable hair, the team explains, looks more like a triangular or even heart-shaped strand when examined under a microscope. Unlike normal, combable hair, they possess grooves along the entirety of their length. The three genes causing this mayhem are PADI3, TCHH and TGM3. In case one of these genes malfunctions, the hair’s texture changes, making it more frizzy and uncombable.

The condition, the scientists believe, is quite rare, since only around 100 cases have been reported so far. This could, however, be because most people don’t seek medical attention when having a bad hair day, which means majority of the sufferers remain undiagnosed. That could as well be you!

The findings of the research have been published in this month’s issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Via: ScienceMagazine

  • Rufus green

    You have a bi racial woman with gorgeous hair as the not normal comable hair? This is garbage and race based science at its finest. What gives you the right to define normal with a picture of a curly haired woman?

    • Hello. We apologize if that offended you, but that wasn’t our intention at all.

    • Hello. We apologize if that offended you, but that wasn’t our intention at all.

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Scientists believe bad hair days could be the result of gene mutations

bad-hair-days

Ever wondered why you wake up with horrid, tangled hair? Or why you seem to have more bad hair days than the next person? As part of a new study, scientists have identified three genes that are responsible for what they call “uncombable hair syndrome”, basically the kind of dry and frizzy hair that is just impossible to comb flat.

If you find yourself having more bad hair days than good, you might be suffering from this rather strange condition. Diagnosis, according to the researchers, involves acquiring hair strands from the patient, which are then cut lengthwise and studied using a powerful electron microscope.

Unmanageable hair, the team explains, looks more like a triangular or even heart-shaped strand when examined under a microscope. Unlike normal, combable hair, they possess grooves along the entirety of their length. The three genes causing this mayhem are PADI3, TCHH and TGM3. In case one of these genes malfunctions, the hair’s texture changes, making it more frizzy and uncombable.

The condition, the scientists believe, is quite rare, since only around 100 cases have been reported so far. This could, however, be because most people don’t seek medical attention when having a bad hair day, which means majority of the sufferers remain undiagnosed. That could as well be you!

The findings of the research have been published in this month’s issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Via: ScienceMagazine

  1. Rufus green says:

    You have a bi racial woman with gorgeous hair as the not normal comable hair? This is garbage and race based science at its finest. What gives you the right to define normal with a picture of a curly haired woman?

    1. Hello. We apologize if that offended you, but that wasn’t our intention at all.

    2. Hello. We apologize if that offended you, but that wasn’t our intention at all.

Comments are closed.

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