Norwegian artist designs three-wheeler dinosaur bike for his cross-country protest trip

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike

Protests can be of many forms: while some choose to raise their voice for whatever cause they are supporting, others prefer public demonstrations and rallies, and still others opt for more radical and often destructive forms of protest. And finally, there is Markus Moestue.

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_2

Born and brought up in Norway, this exceptionally creative artist has designed a singularly innovative and somewhat outlandish three-wheeler dinosaur bike for his trip around the country. The basic framework of the bike was constructed by welding three separate bicycle parts together, such that it can hold the weight of the dinosaur superstructure.

The body of the dinosaur was carved out of a styrofoam and then skilfully sculpted to resemble the actual shape of a velociraptor as closely as possible. With the help of a standard kitchen knife, Moestue chiselled two mammoth chunks of styrofoam to create the pointed head and the long, bony tail of the dinosaur. Layers of epoxy glue and glass fiber coating, along with bright orange and red paints, were masterfully applied to finish the look of this wondrous contrivance. The artist also added intricate details, like the rough folds and scales of the dinosaur skin, razor-sharp teeth and dribbling saliva, to make his creation convincing.

 

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_3

What is indeed more significant about this highly unusual self-constructed bike is that it is currently being used by Moestue to travel across the southern and western parts of Norway, collectively called the ‘Bible Belt’, as a kind of silent protest. Talking about the objective of the endeavor, Markus Moestue said:

It was a protest against the dogmatic religious education of children, and the idea originated from the theme-parks of creationists that teach children that humans and dinosaurs used to live together.

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Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_6

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Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_1

Via: My Modern Met

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Norwegian artist designs three-wheeler dinosaur bike for his cross-country protest trip

Protests can be of many forms: while some choose to raise their voice for whatever cause they are supporting, others prefer public demonstrations and rallies, and still others opt for more radical and often destructive forms of protest. And finally, there is Markus Moestue.

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_2

Born and brought up in Norway, this exceptionally creative artist has designed a singularly innovative and somewhat outlandish three-wheeler dinosaur bike for his trip around the country. The basic framework of the bike was constructed by welding three separate bicycle parts together, such that it can hold the weight of the dinosaur superstructure.

The body of the dinosaur was carved out of a styrofoam and then skilfully sculpted to resemble the actual shape of a velociraptor as closely as possible. With the help of a standard kitchen knife, Moestue chiselled two mammoth chunks of styrofoam to create the pointed head and the long, bony tail of the dinosaur. Layers of epoxy glue and glass fiber coating, along with bright orange and red paints, were masterfully applied to finish the look of this wondrous contrivance. The artist also added intricate details, like the rough folds and scales of the dinosaur skin, razor-sharp teeth and dribbling saliva, to make his creation convincing.

 

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_3

What is indeed more significant about this highly unusual self-constructed bike is that it is currently being used by Moestue to travel across the southern and western parts of Norway, collectively called the ‘Bible Belt’, as a kind of silent protest. Talking about the objective of the endeavor, Markus Moestue said:

It was a protest against the dogmatic religious education of children, and the idea originated from the theme-parks of creationists that teach children that humans and dinosaurs used to live together.

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_4

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_5

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_6

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_7

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_8

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_10

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_9

Markus_Moestue_dinosaur_bike_1

Via: My Modern Met

  Subscribe to HEXAPOLIS

To join over 1,200 of our dedicated subscribers, simply provide your email address: