Roman

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Drone technology possibly revealed a section of a Roman road in Northumberland

An ancient Roman road in Northumberland running from Portgate on Hadrian’s Wall (near the Errington Arms) to the mouth of the River Tweed has been called the Devil's Causeway by scholars and archaeologists. And while the route is known, actual archaeological evidence of the track in various places is rather scant. Interestingly enough, recently a…



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Capital of ancient Roman territory of Dacia to undergo EUR 4.5 million restoration

Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa (or Colonia Ulpia Traiana Augusta Dacica Sarmizegetusa) was the capital and the largest settlement in Roman-controlled Dacia (mainly corresponding to modern Romania and Moldova), with its name partially derived from Sarmizegetusa – the former religious and political center of Dacia. Founded during the reign of Trajan, possibly between 106-107 AD – when…


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Archaeologists come across a ‘jovial’ skeleton mosaic in Turkey

People did have sense of humor (with a dash of hedonism) in the 3rd century BC, or around 2,300 years ago. At least that is what is evident from an incredible ancient mosaic recently discovered in Hatay, a Turkish province that just borders Syria from the north. Th artwork in question features a seemingly 'cheerful'…



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Archaeologists discover 22 surprising shipwrecks near a Greek archipelago

A few days ago, the Greek ministry of culture denoted a 3,500-year old warrior grave as the 'most important to have been discovered in 65 years in continental Greece.' But now it seems, another incredible discovery has triumphed it at least in terms of sheer scale. To that end, a joint Greek-American archaeological expedition (with…



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The mysterious Roman tombstone with a ‘mismatched’ occupant beneath it

A tombstone with fine decorations and details in Latin had enticed many an archaeologist - since its location was found to be in a parking lot in Cirencester, in Western England. In other words, the discovery entailed a pretty rare find, with experts believing it to be the only tombstone from Roman Britain that recorded…



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